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New Tenn. COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are down sharply, but virus related fatalities continue to rise.

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tn.gov
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Mike Osborne) -- COVID-19 deaths are up sharply in Tennessee even as new case counts and hospitalizations continue to fall statewide.

The Delta variant surge that begin in early July appears to be subsiding. The number of new infections reported across the state have now fallen two weeks in a row. Confirmed new cases are down by 73 percent over the 14 day period that ended on Saturday.

New Case counts are also down in all seven counties in the Greater Nashville region. New infections are down 67 percent in Davidson County, 82 percent in Williamson County, and a whopping 86 percent in Rutherford County.

The number of new COVID-19 infections reported among Tennessee’s school age children has also fallen sharply the past two weeks. New cases peaked three weeks ago at well-over 14,000 confirmed childhood infections during a single seven-day period. New infections among children 5 to 18 years of age have now fallen some 83 percent. Just 4900 cases were reported statewide in the week that ended on Saturday.

The number of Tennesseans hospitalized due to COVID-19 complications has fallen as well. Just over 2700 state residents were under hospital care as of Tuesday morning. It was just 19 days ago that hospitalizations peaked at more than 3800 cases.

However, COVID-19 deaths are up sharply statewide. The number of COVID-19 fatalities rose during the past two weeks by 69 percent. During the week that ended Saturday 523 state residents died of virus complications. As in past surges, virus related deaths in Tennessee have lagged behind new case and hospitalization spikes by several weeks.

The current death rate is still well below what Tennessee suffered last winter. A record high 889 state residents died of the virus during the first week in February.