WMOT 89.5 | LISTENER-POWERED RADIO INDEPENDENT AMERICAN ROOTS
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Cardi B is the latest artist to have something thrown at them. So she threw a mic

Cardi B, seen here on July 3, was performing in Las Vegas when a fan threw a drink at her. Concertgoers have thrown objects at musical artists in several highly publicized instances in the past few months.
Michel Euler
/
AP
Cardi B, seen here on July 3, was performing in Las Vegas when a fan threw a drink at her. Concertgoers have thrown objects at musical artists in several highly publicized instances in the past few months.

Rapper Cardi B threw a microphone at an audience member in Las Vegas after the person threw a drink at her, the latest instance of concertgoers throwing things at performers.

Cardi was rapping along to her 2017 hit "Bodak Yellow" on Saturday when the incident occurred. She was visibly shocked before chucking the mic.

The woman who threw the liquid was then flanked by security guards and appeared to be escorted out.

Additional video shows Cardi asking for water to be thrown on her to cool off, though it is unclear whether that was before or after the woman threw the drink. But later in the show, Cardi B clarified that she didn't want anything thrown in her face.

In recent months, there have been several highly publicized incidents of things being thrown at musical artists.

In June, singer Bebe Rexha was sent to the hospital and ended up needing stitches on her left eye after a fan threw a cellphone at her and she collapsed. Rapper Drake was also hit with a cellphone at a show in Chicago this month.

One fan threw their mother's ashes onstage at singer Pink's concert in London, and singer Harry Styles was seen in a video holding his left eye and wincing after an unknown object hit him in the face at a concert in Vienna.

Singer Adele, while performing during her residency in Las Vegas, warned an audience not to throw anything.

"Have you noticed how people are, like, forgetting f***ing show etiquette at the moment? People are throwing s*** onstage?" she said. "Have you seen them? I f***ing dare you. I dare you to throw something at me, and I'll f***ing kill you."

John Drury, a social psychologist at the University of Sussex, said that this kind of behavior seems to have ramped up since concerts have resumed after pandemic closures and could be because people are trying to make viral moments.

"People are now more individual-focused," he told WBURthis month. "They attend events for their own individual pleasure, and they're not really thinking about being part of a group or a collective in the way that they might have been before. These are people who perhaps are treating the event as an opportunity for them to build their social media profile rather than considering the other people around them."

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Ayana Archie