2020_wmot_website_header.png
WMOT 89.5 | LISTENER-POWERED RADIO INDEPENDENT AMERICAN ROOTS
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Liner Notes

Amanda Colleen Williams Pays Tribute To Her Roots With New Album, Appalachia Kid, Out Today

Amanda Colleen Williams by Hillbilly Culture LLC.jpg
Hillbilly Culture LLC
/
Amanda Colleen Williams

Singer-songwriter, venue owner, educator, music publisher and entrepreneur Amanda Colleen Williams has learned and lived music and the music business all throughout her life, including graduating from college in Boston with a magna cum laude degree in Music Business and Management and being the daughter of Nashville Songwriter Hall of Fame member, Kim Williams. She’s involved in many different aspects of music and is regularly called on to speak as a non-attorney copyright expert at government institutions including the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and U.S. Embassies and Consulates worldwide. She is currently piloting a program with the U.S. Department of State called Arts Envoy IPR, combining arts diplomacy and intellectual property rights education. She wrote the song, “She’s Tired of Boys” with Garth Brooks, it’s on his 2014 Man Against The Machine album. Today, Amanda Colleen Williams released a new twelve track album, Appalachia Kid.

AnaLee: You’ve had such an interesting life in music from the business side to the creative side and even with issues like intellectual property rights and your program for arts diplomacy, you still find the passion and time to create music. Tell us a little about your passion for the business side of music and Arts Envoy IPR, then we’ll get into talking about Appalachia Kid and your new music and events venue, The 7695.
Amanda: As the daughter of a songwriter, I always had a soft spot for creative people. My dad was disabled in a work related fire accident before I was born, and thanks to his ability to use his creativity, he was able to continue to work in the professional songwriting world and to be an early part of Garth Brooks’ historic career. It’s only natural for me to continue to stand for songwriters and creative entrepreneurs whenever there’s a need.

AnaLee: It’s been about a year and a half since you first sent me the song, “I Am Saved” which I am really happy to see on your album, Appalachia Kid. I was drawn to the sparse arrangement and the sort of familiar feel to that song. The second one I played on The Local Brew Hour was the title track, “Appalachia Kid”. It paints a little darker picture in sound and lyrically. The album also includes a cover of Bruce Springsteen’s, “I’m On Fire”. Can you tell us a little about the inspiration for the songs on the album, including the Springsteen cover? 
Amanda: The songs from the Appalachia Kid album took a while to come together as a finished collection. We tracked remotely through the past few years, and I was able to experiment with the arrangement and various musicians’ special touches. The song “I’m On Fire” was a keystone song for this project, because it sets the tone for the place in time – early 1980’s rural Appalachia - one ear glued to the radio, and the other listening to my dad and uncles picking and grinning in mamaw’s living room.

AnaLee: Growing up in a musical home, was it always something you knew you wanted to be involved in or did you ever go through a period where you were not interested in following in your father’s footsteps, Nashville Songwriter Hall of Famer, Kim Williams.
Amanda: When I was a kid, my dad sat me down and said, “Mandy, if you can do anything else in the world besides music and be happy, you should do that. But if you have to do music, then do it, and give it everything you’ve got.” I think that’s sound advice for creative people. There can be no plan B if you’re doing it full time.

AnaLee:  Along with singer, songwriter, music publisher, educator and entrepreneur you can now add music venue and event space owner to the list of the many aspects of music you are involved in! Tell us about “The 7695” and is this the old Norm’s Roadhouse space on River Road in West Nashville?
Amanda: Right now, it’s especially important to diversify as a successful independent music entrepreneur. I was running my Songpreneurs business out of the holler for years, making do with barely any internet service, and got the opportunity to take on a private venue facility out in West Nashville, the old Norm’s. We fixed it up, and now it’s called The 7695. You can check it out on the website 7695.us, and come out and see us sometime!

AnaLee: What’s next for you?
Amanda: Well, as my Russian drummer friend once said, “This is good question.” I’m going to keep making music with my independent label writers and artists, as well as pitching our original Hillbilly Culture song catalogs to film and television houses. The next project out is with Texas Dancehall artist Taylor Lewis. I’ll also be hitting the road with my Songlife tour coming very soon. You can keep up to date with us on the amandacolleenwilliams.com website, and be sure to sign up for the email newsletter for special events and invitations. Thanks so much for taking this time with me, Ana. I appreciate your support so much.

“Appalachia Kid”

"I Am Saved"

“She’s Tired Of Boys”

Related Content