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Daniel Robison

  • Niagara Falls used to be one of the biggest cities in New York. But since the 1960s, its population has fallen by more than half. Now, Niagara Falls must stay above 50,000 residents or lose its status as a city — and millions in state and federal funds that act as life support. As the 2020 census looms, city leaders are bracing for the worst, while experimenting with new ways to attract residents.
  • Waterfront revitalization projects in this upstate New York area are breathing new life into the once-thriving port city. Green space development and cleanup efforts to remove the toxic remnants of the city's glory days are bringing people and wildlife back to the harbor.
  • During the long winter months on the eastern shore of Lake Erie, sponge candy is a mainstay. But the temperamental treat isn't available in hot weather, so to get their fix in the summer, fans have to plan in advance.
  • Niagara Falls has long been a magnet for daredevils, but strict laws have kept them away for more than a century. That changes this Friday, when circus performer Nik Wallenda will walk a two-inch-thick wire across the giant waterfall. It's an exception officials hope will rescue tourism — and the city's economy.
  • In a "flash mob," hundreds of people invade a public space to do something in unison. But a "cash mob" adds a mission to that idea. All over the country, crowds of people are being organized on social media sites to invade mom-and-pop stores at a specific day and time to spend money locally.
  • Only 7 percent of plastic waste in the United States is recycled each year, according to the EPA. A startup company in Niagara Falls says it can increase that amount and reduce the country's dependence on foreign oil at the same time.