guitar

895 Fest: Molly Tuttle Is More Than Ready

May 25, 2019
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When we profiled Molly Tuttle last Summer, we knew she was a pioneering female winner of the International Bluegrass Music Association Guitar Player of the Year award and that the wider roots world was watching her as an especially promising singer/songwriter. But we didn’t know what she was conjuring up in the studio as her official album debut. Now we know, and it’s dramatic.

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Billy Strings and Molly Tuttle have propelled the bluegrass guitar style known as flatpicking back to the forefront of roots and jam band music, evoking a time when Doc Watson and Tony Rice were folk stars with significant mainstream fame. But both Billy and Molly would acknowledge a debt to a Nashville guitarist from the generation in between, the jovial, innovative and remarkable David Grier.

Bob Delevante

Getting an early jump on pursuing your dreams is important, and it would be hard to jump earlier than did Colin Linden at his destiny in blues and roots music.

Billy Strings and his band had played their last song. The Ryman Auditorium audience was on its feet emitting every manner of happy exultation at explosive volume. The quartet had taken a group bow and put their instruments to rest. Then emcee Eddie Stubbs, from his podium, suggested Billy Strings do one more song - a rare encore for an opening act.

In Nashville, arguably the greatest guitar town in the world, Guthrie Trapp is at the top of the mountain. He can range across every style, improvise with endless invention and subtlety. He can shred or twang or drift elegantly. And most of the time, he’s seen or heard as a sideman and studio player. Through the 2000s, he's been in demand for being able to serve and enhance a song and do no more than what’s called for. But he’s also a mind-bending solo artist. And his second LP as a leader and composer came out this spring.

A Guitar Pull Of Greatness For A Merle Travis Centennial

Apr 16, 2018

As birthday parties go, this one’s a bit on the late side, but nobody, least of all the late great Merle Travis, will notice or care. He was born on Nov. 17, 1917 in Rosewood, Kentucky, so this week’s tribute show on April 18, 2018 at the City Winery is more of a centenary celebration, but there’s a lot to acknowledge and the lineup of musicians pulled together by the Grammy Museum and Travis’s son Thom Bresh is a guitar pull of the gods.