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Greg Collard

Greg has been with WFAE since 2008, all as news director. He came to WFAE from West Virginia Public Broadcasting. In his eight years there, Greg had roles as a reporter, editor and producer. He was the executive producer of a television newsmagazine and news director for radio and television when he decided to head south for Charlotte.

He thanks Giles Snyder, now a familiar voice at NPR, for hiring him for his first job in public radio after stints at newspapers in West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky.

If he’s not working, chances are Greg is fishing or paying attention to sports. He usually has a fishing pole in his car because, well, you never know when or where the fish are biting. He likes to spend his weekends and summer evenings bass fishing the chain of lakes on the Catawba and Yadkin rivers.

  • Genealogy has become a massive industry, from websites like Ancestry.com to TV shows like Who Do You Think You Are? But those focus on family lineage. What about the heirlooms and stories that fill the history of a family tree? A North Carolina business is trying to help.
  • There are many programs to help the homeless: Shelters, soup kitchens and job assistance programs. Officials in Charlotte, N.C., are trying something else: Running programs.
  • In the mid-'90s, the big banks set up the Mortgage Electronic Registration System, or MERS, to track mortgages as they're traded by investors in mortgage-backed securities. It's a system set up to let banks skip the process of paying recurring filing fees at county courthouses each time a mortgage was bought or sold. Now, many cash-strapped local governments, big and small, are filing lawsuits against MERS. Politicians contend their communities are owed millions of dollars.
  • At High Point, N.C.'s biannual furniture market, manufacturers hawk their products to retailers. And this week, a large pavilion is dedicated to American-made furniture. There are signs that shifts in China could spur a comeback for furniture makers in the United States.