politics and Government

tn.gov

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  New Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee is getting some strong pushback after asking state departments to plan for two-percent budget cuts in the coming fiscal year.

In preparation for budget hearings at the capitol, Lee asked commissioners to submit plans for budget reductions, but told reporters he hadn’t yet decided whether to make those cuts.

On Friday, Corrections Commissioner Tony Parker told Lee to expect his department to ask for more funding to cover much-needed raises.

It's tax season, so beware of scammers

Jan 29, 2019
irs.gov

NASVHILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Tax season is officially underway. The IRS began accepting returns this week and e-filing is now available.

Don’t expect the recent government shutdown to save you from Uncle Sam. Your tax return is still due on April 15.

If you need a little help with your return, but can’t afford a paid tax prep service, you do have options. Several mid-state groups are offering free help, including AARP Tennessee. Pam Holcomb is their spokesperson.

nashville.gov

NASHVILE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Nashville has it’s new Police Oversight Board.

Metro Council chose the eleven-member panel Tuesday night in a five-hour, marathon session. Several rounds of voting slowly whittled down the original list of more than 150 applicants.

The Council last week approved two board members nominated by Mayor David Briley. Last night they approved two more panelists nominated by council members. Most of the evening was devoted to selecting the remaining seven board members.

tn.gov

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Gov. Bill Lee is settling into his new job this week on Capitol Hill after taking the oath of office on Saturday.

During his inaugural speech, Lee stressed many of the same policy priorities he campaigned on: Criminal justice reform, a new emphasis on vocational education, and building on the state’s strong economy.

But Lee noted that while the state as a whole may be prospering, many Tennesseans are struggling.

2018 another bad year for pedestrians in Music City

Jan 18, 2019
walkbikenashville.org

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Music City pedestrians may have another tough year ahead if early January is any indication. Two people have already been struck and killed on the city’s streets in 2019.

A man was struck by a bus on Jan. 1 on Fourth Ave. A woman was struck and killed by an SUV on Old Hickory Jan. 9.

Nora Kern with Walk Bike Nashville notes that 2018 again set a grim record for pedestrian deaths with 22 people killed citywide (see cout note below). She says the same number of pedestrians died in 2017.

secondharvestmidtn.org

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Second Harvest Food Bank will on Wednesday distribute charity food boxes to security screeners at Nashville International Airport.

 

Second Harvest tells WMOT the federal Transportation Security Administration office in Nashville requested aid for its employees. TSA agents have now been working 25 days without pay due to partial government shutdown. 

 

Ally Parsons is a Second Harvest spokesperson.

 

tn.gov

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (OSBORNE)  --  Tennessee lawmakers are sharing their legislative priorities as the 2019 session gets underway.

Jeff Yarbro is the State Senate Minority Leader. The Nashville Democrat says Medicaid expansion continues to be one of his party’s biggest legislative priorities.

“We’re one of about ten states, eleven states that hasn’t expanded Medicaid at this point, which is putting a lot of pressure on small town hospitals and lots of families unnecessarily.”

National Park Service

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (WMOT/TNS)  --  Tennessee’s tourism industry is happy that The Great Smoky Mountains National Park remains at least partially open during the government shutdown, but some are questioning that decision.

The park is one of Tennessee’s most important economic engines. Federal data shows the Smokies attract some 11 million visitors a year who spend in excess of $800 million annually.

Park officials are using camping and other visitor fees to keep the Smokies partially staffed. but there have been reports of trash, overflowing toilets and damaged property.

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